Drones with Camera
Best Camera drones
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Nikwax Tech Wash Review

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Deep research of camera professional drones

Check what we think about each and get best offers

From pricing and different camera specs and handling/responsiveness to flight software and battery life, it’s important to do your research and to make sure you’re buying a drone that’s suited to your needs.

All of the models in this list are ready-to-fly. After charging your LiPo battery and reading through your user manual a few times, you’re ready to power up, calibrate, configure, and then to start racking up those flight hours.

The DJI Inspire 2 launched November 2016 and will start shipping January 2017. This newest model is tougher and more powerful than the DJI Inspire 1.

One of the first upgrades you’ll notices it that the Inspire 2 has TWO DIFFERENT CAMERAS. One slung underneath the aircraft offering full 360° camera rotation, and the other mounted on the front of the aircraft for better first-person-view (FPV) opportunities.

So using the Inspire 2’s dual operator mode, one Remote Pilot-in-Command could be looking through one camera, likely the front-mounted one, while a photographer or videographer controls the bottom-mounted camera system.

Key Specs

  • Camera Resolution: 30MP in DNG RAW mode
  • Video Resolution: 5.2K at 30 FPS / 4K at 60 FPS
  • Max Flight Time: 27 minutes
  • Max Speed: 67 mph
  • Notable Attributes: Dual-Operator Mode, Two Cameras, Obstacle Avoidance
9Expert Score
Best drone

For aerial photographers, there is a DNG RAW mode that captures 30-megapixel still images. We guess it's best drone

Speed
10
Price
8
Functions
10
Battery
9
Positive
  • Possible to use professional camera
  • Battery Life is great
  • Elegant PRO look
  • Many smart functions
Negatives
  • No found

The DJI Inspire 1 is bigger and offers full 360° camera rotation, giving you an unrestricted view of the world below. It’s 3-axis gimbal and camera system can easily be removed from the aircraft for safe transport and future upgrades.

And because DJI offers different camera systems (like the Zenmuse X3, Zenmuse X5, Zenmuse X5R, Zenmuse XT, etc.), the DJI Inspire 1 is flexible and the kind of model you can grow with over time.

Key Specs

  • Camera Resolution: 12MP
  • Video Resolution: 4K at 30 FPS
  • Max Flight Time: 18 minutes
  • Max Speed: 49 mph (22 m/s) in ATTI mode, no wind
  • Notable Attributes: Dual-Operator Mode, Multiple Zenmuse Camera Systems
8Expert Score
Good drone

If you’re looking for a bigger bird with payload flexibility, 360° camera rotation, and dual-operator mode, the DJI Inspire 1 is a great fit.

Speed
9
Price
8.5
Functions
9
Battery
8
Positive
  • Possible to use professional camera
  • Battery Life is great
  • Elegant PRO look
  • Many smart functions
Negatives
  • No found

When it comes to flight time, the Karma will stay airborne for 20 minutes, which isn’t all that great in the grand scheme of things. And, once again, the Mavic has it beat, although only very slightly, with a max flight time of 21 minutes. It can, however, last up to 27 minutes according to DJI. Of course, you can bring extra batteries along for both of these drones, which looks like it’s going to be a necessity given the paltry flying times.

Key Specs

  • Maximum Speed 15 m/sMaximum Speed 15 m/s
  • Maximum Distance Up to 3,000 m
  • Maximum Flight Altitude 3,200 m
  • Maximum Wind Resistance 10 m/s
  • Operating Frequency 2.4GHz
  • Dimensions (Opened/No Propellers) 303 / 411 / 117 mm
  • Dimensions (Folded/Transport) 365.2 / 224.3 / 89.9 mm
  • Propeller Length 25.4cm
  • Weight 1006g
8Expert Score
Best Camera

One big advantage is that you can detach camera and use stabilizer as gymbal for gopro

Speed
9
Price
8.5
Functions
9
Battery
8
Positive
  • Possible to use professional camera
  • Battery Life is great
  • Elegant PRO look
  • Many smart functions
Negatives
  • No found

If you haven’t heard of Yuneec, you’re missing out on some high-quality aerial camera platforms that may very well be the perfect fit for your recreational (or business) needs.

The Typhoon H is equipped with six rotors, a 360-degree gimbal camera and retractable landing gear with Yuneec’s standard of being ready out of the box, easy and safe to fly, with stunning Ultra HD 4K video and stills.

Key Specs

  • Camera Resolution: 12.4MP
  • Video Resolution: 4K at 30 FPS
  • Max Flight Time: 25 minutes
  • Max Speed: 43.5mph (70km/h) in Follow Me mode
  • Notable Attributes: Hexacopter = better redundancy, Obstacle Avoidance, 360-degree camera
7Expert Score
Cheap drone

Not the best drone, but it's price is much cheaper than other

Speed
6.5
Price
10
Functions
5.5
Battery
8
Positive
  • Possible to use professional camera
  • Battery Life is great
  • Elegant PRO look
  • Many smart functions
Negatives
  • No found

Winner - DJI INSPIRE 2

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Best Backpacking Sleeping Bags

Ideally, a backpacker will have a few sleeping bags in their arsenal to provide comfort over a wide range of temperatures. For most, this is not practical. As such, a backpacker should select a bag that will be adequate most of the time to ensure a sound sleep. Sleeping bags are either made from down or synthetic materials. I highly recommend a down bag for the reasons below.

1. Down

  • Most common amongst backpackers
  • Higher warmth to weight ratio
  • More compressible
  • Useless when wet (can be avoided with proper precautions)
  • Fraction of hikers are allergic
  • Example: Western Mountaineering UltraLite

2. Synthetic

  • Higher warmth when wet
  • Can be used by hikers with down allergies
  • Lower warmth to weight ratio
  • Less compressible
  • Example: North Face Cat’s Meow
Sleeping bags come in 2 main shape choices, rectangular and mummy.

1. Mummy

  • Most common amongst backpackers
  • Less material = less weight (compared to same size rectangular bag)
  • Less airspace to heat up (for a warmer sleep)
  • Can be constricting
  • Example: Western Mountaineering UltraLite

2. Rectangular

  • More space is helpful for restless sleepers
  • More airspace to heat up
  • Can be heavier
  • Example: Big Agnes Summit Park
Lastly, sleeping bags come in many different temperature ratings and have many different features. Continue reading to learn more.

Selecting the Right Sleeping Bag

When selecting a bag, a hiker should consider:
  • Weight/volume constraints
  • Temperatures to be encountered
  • Body size
  • Comfort needs
I typically start my bag selection process by defining my constraints. I am always looking for a smaller and lighter bag for a given temperature rating. As such, these constraints always drive my choice for a down bag. I also tend to prefer bags with an 800+ fill power. They have a higher warmth to weight ratio, but the catch is they are more expensive. Next, a backpacker should define the temperature extremes they expect to use the bag in. I typically think of the extremes as the range of temperatures that will be encountered 90% of the time. I can sacrifice one or two cold nights for a lighter bag. Also, I can tradeoff temperature rating when using a warmer sleeping pad. Pay extra careful attention to the temperature rating. Some bags are defined by the EN ratings. This rating system provides a more real-world feel for the bag. Other bags simply set a lower limit. Often times, these “lower” limits are expressed on the high-side meaning you will be cold when sleeping in those temperatures. For more information regarding temperature ratings click here . When selecting a bag based on temperature ratings also take in account whether you are a warm or cold sleeper. Depending on this answer you may want to go up or down one level. I, for instance, am a cold sleeper so I tend to be conservative when selecting a bag. The choice may also be different for men and women as women tend to sleep colder. Next up, determine your body size. You should select a bag that is long enough for your height, but not too long to add unnecessary airspace to heat up. The same goes for the width of the bag. The goal here is to select a bag that you will comfortably fit in without having too much dead space. This is the main reason why mummy bags are a more efficient choice. Lastly, there exist many finer details that a backpacker should consider when selecting a sleeping bag. Below are few of the more common choices and their benefits.
  • Full-size hood keeps in heat around your head (responsible for a large amount of heat loss)
  • Neck collar also keeps in heat
  • Full-length zipper provides the option of ventilating your feet area when temperatures are warmer and can also allow the bag to be used like a quilt in warmer temperatures

Test Driving Sleeping Bags

There is not much you can do in a store for these. You just need to get out there and try it! I typically will test drive a new bag the same way as I would for sleeping pads mentioned above.
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